8 Most Common Chicken Diseases During Rainy Season!

Chickens are popular domesticated birds, but they can be susceptible to various diseases, especially during the rainy season. The combination of increased humidity and wet conditions creates a favorable environment for the growth of bacteria, viruses, pathogen and other harmful microorganisms.

In this blog post we will discuss about 7 Most Common Chicken Diseases During Rainy Season including the disease, symptoms and prevention measure.

Most Common Chicken Diseases During Rainy Season

8 Most Common Chicken Diseases During Rainy Season

If you will see, there are many diseases that chickens are get effected throughout the years, but some of them are such common diseases which are mostly occurs in chickens in rainy seasons.

As a responsible chicken keeper, it’s essential to be aware of the most common chicken diseases during the rainy season and take preventive measures to protect your flocks.

Here are the such common chicken diseases which are seen in Rainy days:

  1. Coccidiosis
  2. E. Coli Infection
  3. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)
  4. Chronic Respiratory Disease (CRD)
  5. Common Diarrhea
  6. Fowl-Pox
  7. Fowl Cholera
  8. Infectious Bronchitis

All these mentioned above diseases are very dangerous for chickens because, if these diseases are not treated in time, then lot of mortality can be seen in chickens.  Now let’s discuss one-by-one about all these 7 most common chicken diseases during rainy season.

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1) Coccidiosis

Coccidiosis in chicken

Coccidiosis is a parasitic disease that can affect chickens of all ages. It is caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria, which are found in the intestinal tract of chickens. There are several different species of Eimeria that can infect chickens, and each species can cause a different set of symptoms.

Coccidiosis disease can be seen in chickens any time throughout the years, but mostly is seen during the Rainy and Summer seasons. This disease is more common in rainy days just because of the higher amount of moisture present in the environment.

Due to excessive moisture present in the environment that cause growth of fungus in the feeds, growth the protozoan parasites around, sometimes liter remain very wet etc. These all are the main cause of spreading Coccidiosis disease in poultry during rainy days.

Symptoms:

The symptoms of coccidiosis can vary or depending on the species of Eimeria that is causing the infection, the age of the chicken, and the severity of the infection.

For example, coccidiosis caused by E. tenella is more likely to cause bloody diarrhea, while coccidiosis caused by E. necatrix is more likely to cause weight loss and lethargy.

Here are the most common symptoms of coccidiosis in chickens include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Weight loss
  • Bloody droppings
  • Lethargy
  • Pale comb and wattles
  • Ruffled feathers
  • Increased thirst
  • Dehydration
  • Death

Prevention:

The best way to prevent coccidiosis is by vaccinate your chickens timely. There are different vaccines available, your veterinarian or experienced chicken farmers can help you choose the right one for your flock.

There are a number of things that can be done to prevent coccidiosis in chickens, including:

  • Vaccinate your chickens.
  • Provide your chickens with a clean, dry coop.
  • Rotate your chickens’ feed.
  • Avoid to feeding moldy or spoiled food
  • Add probiotics to your chickens’ feed: Probiotics can help to keep your chickens’ gut healthy and prevent the growth of coccidia.
  • Monitor your chickens for signs of illness

Finally, you can help to prevent coccidiosis by adding coccidiostat to your chickens’ feed. Coccidiostat is a medication that helps to prevent the growth of Eimeria parasites.

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2) E. Coli Infection

Ecoli in chicken

E. coli is a type of bacteria which is commonly found in the intestines of chickens and other animals. It is usually harmless, but it can cause disease if it enters the bloodstream or other organs.

E. coli disease in chickens is known as colibacillosis. It can be caused by a number of different strains of E. coli, and the severity of the disease can vary depending on the strain.

If you suspect that your chickens have infected by E. Coli bacteria, it is important to consult with a veterinarian as soon as possible. Early diagnosis and treatment can help to prevent the spread of disease and improve the chances of recovery.

Symptoms:

The symptoms of E. coli infection in chickens can vary depending on the severity of the infection and the affected organ systems. Here are the most common symptoms of E-Coli infection in chickens include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Dehydration
  • Lethargy
  • Ruffled feathers
  • Pale comb and wattles
  • Yellowish droppings
  • Swollen abdomen
  • Death

Prevention:

The best way to prevent colibacillosis is to vaccinate your chickens. There are different vaccines that are available, your veterinarian or a experienced chicken farmer can help you choose the right one for your flock.

You can also help to prevent colibacillosis by keeping your chickens’ coop clean and dry. E. coli can survive in the environment for long periods of time, so it is important to clean up chickens droppings or other dirt on a regular basis.

Finally, you can help to prevent colibacillosis by adding probiotics to your chickens’ feed. Probiotics can help to improve the gut health of chickens and prevent the growth of harmful bacteria.

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3) Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

Avian Influenza in chicken

Avian influenza (AI), also known as bird flu, is a highly contagious viral infection that can affect poultry and other birds. It can also be transmitted to humans, but this is rare.

There are many different strains of AI, and some are more severe than others. The most severe strain, H5N1, can be fatal to both poultry and humans.

There is no specific treatment for AI, but supportive care can help to improve the chances of survival. This may include providing chickens with fluids, electrolytes, and antibiotics.

Symptoms:

The severity of symptoms can vary and depending on the strain of the virus and the chicken’s age, health status, immune response etc. Here are some common symptoms of avian influenza in chickens:

  • Sudden death
  • Diarrhea
  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Rash
  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Pale comb and wattles

Prevention:

Preventing avian influenza (bird flu) in chickens is essential to protect your flock and to help prevent the spread of the disease to other birds and potentially to humans. Here are some important preventive measures that you have to implement:

  • Keeping chickens in a clean and dry coop.
  • Providing chickens with fresh, clean water.
  • Vaccinate chickens against AI.
  • Monitoring chickens for signs of illness.
  • Isolating sick chickens from the rest of the flock.
  • Dispose of droppings and other waste properly.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly after handling chickens or their droppings.
  • Do not bring new chickens onto your property without first quarantining them for at least 30 days.
  • Avoid contact between your chickens and wild birds.
  • Be aware of any AI outbreaks in your area.
  • Follow the guidelines of your local animal health authority.

4) Chronic Respiratory Disease (CRD)

CRD in chicken

CRD, or Chronic Respiratory Disease, is a common respiratory infection in chickens. It is caused by a bacterium called Mycoplasma gallisepticum. CRD can be mild or severe and it can be deadly in some cases.

The Chronic Respiratory Disease (CRD) such a common disease in poultry which is occur throughout the year, but most of the chicken farmers are suffer from this during Rainy season due to their chickens get badly effected by CRD disease.

Symptoms:

The symptoms of CRD in chickens can vary depending on the severity of the infection. In mild cases, the symptoms may be subtle and may include:

  • Increased respiratory rate
  • Whistling or coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite

In more severe cases, the symptoms may be more pronounced and may include:

  • Severe respiratory distress
  • Fever
  • Weight loss
  • Death

Prevention:

CRD can be spread through contact with infected chickens, their droppings, or respiratory secretions. It can also be spread through the air, so it’s important to follow these tips to help prevent CRD in chickens:

  • Quarantine new bringing chickens at least for 30 days before introducing them to your flock.
  • Vaccinate your chickens against CRD.
  • Keep your chicken coop and run clean and dry.
  • Dispose of droppings properly.
  • Monitor your chickens for signs of illness.
  • Sanitize your coop and equipment regularly.

5) Common Diarrhea

Diarrhea in chicken

Diarrhea is a common problem in chickens and it can be caused in chickens by different reasons. If the diarrhea is caused by a diet problem, then you should have to changing their diet. If the diarrhea is caused by stress, reduce stress in the flock.

If you notice that your chickens are suffering from diarrhea, it is important to take them to the vet to get a diagnosis or you yourself can start giving medicines to the effected birds.

Symptoms:

Diarrhea is a very common problem in chickens and it can be caused by different things. Some of most common causes of diarrhea in chickens include:

  • Infection: Diarrhea can be caused by a variety of different infections, including salmonella, coccidiosis, and E. coli.
  • Diet: Chickens that eat a diet that is too high in fat or protein can develop diarrhea.
  • Stress: Chickens that are stressed can also develop diarrhea. Stress can be caused by different things, such as changes in the environment, new chickens being introduced to the flock, predators etc.
  • Parasites: Chickens can also develop diarrhea due to parasites, such as worms or mites.
  • Food poisoning: Chickens can also effected by diarrhea if they eat food that is bad or spoiled.

Prevention:

With proper care, most chickens with diarrhea will make a full recovery. However, if the diarrhea is get severe condition or does not respond positively, it can be deadly. Here are some tips to help prevent diarrhea in chickens:

  • Keep your chickens’ coop clean and dry.
  • Provide them with fresh, clean water at all times.
  • Feed them a balanced diet that is free of moldy or spoiled food.
  • Vaccinate your chickens against common poultry diseases.
  • Deworm your chicken at every 40 days of interval.
  • Keep your chickens liver healthy by using liver tonic regularly.

6) Fowl-Pox

fowlpox in chicken

Fowlpox is a viral disease that can affect chickens at any ages, mostly after when chickens get 20 days old. Although it is not always cause death in chickens, however, it can result in economic losses due to decreased egg production, meat production and compromised meat quality.

Fowlpox is a highly contagious viral disease that affects chickens, turkeys, ducks, and other poultry birds. It is caused by a virus called the fowlpox virus, which is a member of the poxvirus family.

Fowlpox can be spread through contact with infected birds, their droppings, or scabs. It can also be spread through the air.

Symptoms:

The symptoms of fowl pox in poultry can vary or depending on the different factors such as, strain of the virus, age of the chickens, overall health condition of the chickens etc. In general, the symptoms that appears:

  • Wart-like lesions on the comb, wattles, eyelids, and other skin areas.
  • Crusty scabs on the vent and other areas.
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lethargy

Prevention:

There is no cure for fowl pox, but most birds recover on their own. However, some birds may die from the disease, especially young birds or birds that are already sick.

There is a vaccine available for fowl pox. Vaccinating your birds can help to protect them from the disease.

Here are some tips to help prevent fowl pox in poultry:

  • Keep your chickens coop clean and dry.
  • Provide your chickens with fresh, clean water.
  • Vaccinate your chickens against fowl pox.
  • Monitor your chickens for signs of illness and seek veterinary care promptly if you notice any problems.

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7) Fowl Cholera

Fowl Cholera in chicken

Fowl Cholera, also known as avian cholera, is a contagious bacterial disease that affects various species of birds, including chickens. It is caused by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida.

This disease can have severe economic impacts on poultry farms due to increased mortality rates and decreased eggs and meat production.

Symptoms:

The symptoms of fowl cholera in chickens can vary and depending on different factors including, the strain of the bacteria and the age of the bird. In general, the symptoms include:

  • Sudden death
  • Diarrhea
  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Lethargy
  • Pale comb and wattles
  • Swollen abdomen
  • Egg production may decrease or stop
  • Eggs may be soft-shelled or misshapen

Prevention:

Fowl cholera can be spread through contact with infected chickens, their droppings, or respiratory secretions. It can also be spread through the air. Here are some tips to help prevent fowl cholera in chickens:

  • Keep your chickens’ coop clean and dry.
  • Provide your chickens with fresh, clean water.
  • Vaccinate your chickens against fowl cholera.
  • Monitor your chickens for signs of illness and seek veterinary care promptly if you notice any problems.

8) Infectious Bronchitis

Infectious Bronchitis in chicken

Infectious bronchitis (IB) is a highly contagious respiratory disease that affects chickens and other poultry. It is caused by a virus called the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), which primarily targets the respiratory and reproductive systems of chickens.

This disease can lead to significant economic losses in the poultry industry due to reduced egg production, poor egg quality, and increased mortality rates.

Symptoms:

Symptoms of infectious bronchitis in chickens can vary or depending on different factors such as, the strain of the virus, age of the chicken etc. However here some major symptoms that occurs including:

  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Rough breathing
  • Watery eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Decreased egg production

In some cases, IB can also cause more serious problems, such as pneumonia or death.

Prevention:

IB can be spread through contact with infected chickens, their droppings, or respiratory secretions. It can also be spread through the air. Here are some tips to help prevent infectious bronchitis in chickens:

  • Keep your chickens’ coop clean and dry.
  • Provide your chickens with fresh, clean water.
  • Vaccinate your chickens against IB.
  • Monitor your chickens for signs of illness and seek veterinary care promptly if you notice any problems.

Watch a Video to Know More About Diseases:

Conclusion

In conclusion, this was the 8 most common diseases which may occurs in your chickens during rainy season. Apart from this all, there are many other diseases that can be seen in you chickens during rainy season or throughout the year.

If you suspect any of the disease in your chickens, it is important to consult with a veterinarian. The vet can help you to diagnose the disease and recommend the best course of treatment.

Hopefully, you got something from the post 8 Most Common Chicken Diseases During Rainy Season, If you like this post, then please drop your valuable feedback by commenting bellow and don’t forget to share this post with your friends or chicken lovers,

Thank You! Happy Farming.

FAQs

Q1: Can chickens get sick from a dirty coop?

Yes, dirty coop can cause many diseases in chickens such as, diarrhea, coryza, CRD, coccidiosis etc.

Q2: Can chickens get sick in the rain?

Yes, chickens can get sick in the rain due to temperature fluctuation in rainy days.

Q3: Is rain bad for hens?

Rain is not bad for hens, but it’s important to take precautions to protect them from the elements.

Q4: How do I protect my chickens from rain?

If it is raining heavily, you may want to bring your chickens inside. This is especially important if the rain is cold or if there is a lot of wind.

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